21 colleges that offer free tuition

College student debt is soaring, as many recent graduates are well aware. It follows, then, that prospective students would be making the affordability and profitability of their education a priority when selecting their future school. Some colleges and universities are also looking to alleviate the financial burdens many students are subjected to after graduation.
On the one hand, some schools, including members of the Ivy League, are looking to increase their competitiveness in recruiting and enrolling undergraduate students by making it more affordable for low- and middle-income students to attend — namely by replacing needs-based loans with grants or scholarships as well as covering the entire cost of tuition for some based on family income. There are also some small colleges that offer free tuition and cover the cost of other expenses for all of their students. The catch? These schools tend to be super-specialized or based on Christian values. Some of these schools are considered Work Colleges, which is a group of seven colleges in the U.S. that integrate part-time work as part of a student’s total education.

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GOP fails to stop Democrats’ sit-in on House floor

Washington (CNN)The Republicans tried to shut it down, but the Democrats’ nearly day-long sit-in was still going Thursday and showed no signs of letting up.

In the middle of the night, House Republicans had sought to end an extraordinary day of drama and what has become a 21-hour sit-in by adjourning for a recess that will last through July 5.
The move was an effort to shut down a protest that began Wednesday morning when Democrats took over the House floor and tried to force votes on gun control. But shortly after 7:00 a.m., about 20 Democrats still remained on the floor, including House Minority leader Nancy Pelosi, and they were determined to continue.

 

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How to shave hundreds off your credit card bill

Who hasn’t signed up for a service and then completely forgotten about it?
For me, it was an Amazon Web Services account that I signed up for as a grad student.
Last year, I realized I hadn’t actually canceled it and was being charged $10 a month. I paid $120 over the course of a year before taking a closer look at my credit card and finally canceling.
Turns out I’m not alone. A lot of people don’t realize that they’re paying for services they signed up for ages ago and then forgot about.
Startups like Trim and TrueBill are stepping in to help.

 

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The Myth Of The Absent Black Father

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently published new data on the role that American fathers play in parenting their children. Most of the CDC’s previous research on family life — which the agency explores as an important contributor to public health and child development — has focused exclusively on mothers. But the latest data finds that the stereotypical gender imbalance in this area doesn’t hold true, and dads are just as hands-on when it comes to raising their kids.
That includes African-American fathers.

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New Crowdfunding Site Designed for Youth and Millennial Entrepreneurs

An ambitious new crowdfunding platform aims to do more than just host a fundraiser for your next great idea or business; it teaches you how to build a winning and profitable campaign.

Freudon, the world’s first 360° crowdfunding platform designed for the specific needs of youth and millennials ages 16-35, launched in spring 2016. It has already raised over $100,000 for its entrepreneurs within its first month. The global company works with international startups, spotlighting the critical need to empower youth to enter the world stage with their ideas and stories.

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Muhammad Ali, boxing champion and global good-will ambassador, dies at 74

Muhammad Ali, the charismatic three-time heavyweight boxing champion of the world and Olympic gold medalist who transcended the world of sports to become a symbol of the antiwar movement of the 1960s and ultimately a global ambassador for cross-cultural understanding, died Friday night at a hospital in Phoenix, where he was living. He was 74.
The Associated Press and other news outlets confirmed the death. The boxer had been hospitalized with respiratory problems related to Parkinson’s disease, which had been diagnosed in the 1980s.

Mr. Ali dominated boxing in the 1960s and 1970s and held the heavyweight title three times. His fights were among the most memorable and spectacular in history, but he quickly became at least as well known for his colorful personality, his showy antics in the ring and his standing as the country’s most visible member of the Nation of Islam.

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Official says Prince died of opioid overdose

A law-enforcement official tells The Associated Press that tests show Prince died of an opioid overdose.

The 57-year-old singer was found dead April 21 at his Minneapolis-area estate.

The official, who is close to the investigation, spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

The findings confirm suspicions that opioids played a role in the musician’s death. After he died, a law enforcement official told the AP that investigators were examining whether an overdose was to blame and whether a doctor had prescribed him drugs in the preceding weeks.

Prince’s death came less than a week after his plane made an emergency stop in Moline, Illinois, for medical treatment as he was returning from an Atlanta concert. The official said Prince was found unconscious on the plane and that first responders gave him a shot of Narcan, an antidote used in suspected opioid overdoses.

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8 Perks of a Better Credit Score

LIFE IS EASIER WITH A GOOD CREDIT SCORE
Your credit score affects virtually every financial aspect of your life. It’s used to help you get a credit card, a car loan, a mortgage and approval for many other types of financing. Your car insurance and home insurance bills can be lower with a better credit score. Even a cellphone contract’s terms, your utility deposit or the amount of money you have to give your landlord upfront as a security deposit can all come down to that number.
A poor credit score can make all of this considerably more expensive — potentially tens of thousands of dollars over the course of a lifetime. (We even made a calculator so you can see just how much you’re losing to bad credit.)
And if your credit is bad enough, it can nearly limit your access to financing or even whether you land a new job. In those cases, it can become a source of serious stress, making you feel like you just can’t leave the past behind and move on. Luckily, there are a lot of things you can do to build good credit and reap the rewards that come along with it.
Here are eight benefits that can come from having a good credit score.

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PLEASE READ

Summary of North Carolina Expunctions

Use this new summary of North Carolina expunctions as an initial guide to understanding the criteria and filing requirements of the various expunctions in North Carolina. This summary is intended to provide accurate, general information. However, this summary does not fully address the provisions of each expunction statute. In addition, laws and legal proceddures are subject to frequent changes and differing interpretations, and the North Carolina Justice Center cannot ensure the information in this summary is current, particularly beyond 2014.

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The NC Second Chance Alliance is a statewide alliance of advocacy organizations, service providers, faith-based organizations, community leaders and interested citizens that have come together to achieve the safe and successful reintegration of adults and juveniles with criminal records by promoting policies that remove barriers to productive citizenship.

Consider these facts:

1.6 million North Carolians have criminal records.
Approximately 40,000 individuals are currently in North Carolina’s 70 prisons.
Currently, 1 in 106 Caucasian males is incarcerated, while 1 in 36 Latino males and 1 in 15 African-American males are incarcerated.
It costs the NC Department of Public Safety $27,000 annually to incarcerate someone.
95% of incarcerated individuals will eventually leave prison and return home.
92% of employers conduct criminal background checks; an applicant with a criminal record is 50% less likely to receive a call back.
More than 900 state and federal laws deny North Carolinians a wide range of privileges and rights based on a criminal record.
North Carolina’s 3-year recidivism rate is 40%.
What’s clear to us is that the current system of incarceration and re-incarceration is not working. It’s eroding the safety of our communities, draining our state’s resources, and failing those who have paid their debts to society.